Dogs and hot summers - Weekend

Dogs and hot summers

SUMMER is here and so is the heat. While it’s easy for us humans to cool ourselves with an iced drink or lounge in an air-conditioned room, we can’t say the same with our pet dogs. Excessive heat is harmful to dogs, so in these extra hot times, pay extra attention to your pets, since they never seem to complain about anything. And that could spell trouble. Here are a few tips from online experts on how to make your pet dogs as comfy as can be this summer.

SUNNY WALK. It’s such a wonderful sight: owners and their dogs enjoying a sunny afternoon at the park. But ever wondered what’s the best time to take your dog for a walk? (AP FOTO)
SUNNY WALK. It’s such a wonderful sight: owners and their dogs enjoying a sunny afternoon at the park. But ever wondered what’s the best time to take your dog for a walk? (AP FOTO)

Early morning or late night exercise. Dog whisperer Cesar Milan explains that since these parts of the day are cooler, walks will be more comfortable for both the owner and the dog. “I’m a believer in vigorous exercise for healthy dogs, but this is the time of year to back off on exercise intensity,” the TV celebrity says in his website Cesar’s Way.

Keep dogs hydrated. “Always provide water, whether your pets are inside or out with you,” suggests The Humane Society in the US. Leaving clean bowls of water in and out of the house or kennel should do the trick.

Keep a nose on heatstroke. The Petfinder website warns that heatstroke shouldn’t be taken lightly. “Symptoms inlcude panting, lethargy, drooling, fever, vomiting and collapse,” the website says, adding that if your dog shows any of these symptoms, you should go to the vet immediately.

Pets left in cars a no-no. The Animal Welfare League advices: “Never leave your pet in a stationary car as it takes less than two minutes for them to overheat.” That goes for most pets and, well, kids, too.

Keep paws off hot surfaces. “Running on concrete, asphalt or sand can also be a problem since these surfaces get very hot and can burn a dog’s pads,” explains Dr. Ruth MacPete of Pet Health Network. Again, the best way to avoid this problem is to not take your dogs out during the hottest times of the day. (Freon L. Ollival)

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