Photo editing - SunStar

Photo editing

Albert PedrosaAlbert Pedrosa
Photo Mania

A COUPLE of weeks ago, I had a one-on-one tutorial with a wedding photographer who’s just starting out. She wanted to learn more about post-processing and how improve her finished product. I have great respect for those who want to sharpen their skills and actually do something about it. There is a large gap between those who take actions and those who don’t.

When I teach photo editing, I connect it to photography since it has to be understood that editing is an extension of photography. You can never claim that a photograph is yours if there are two artists, namely, the photographer and the editor, who worked on it. Although there are photographers who hire editors and just guide them with their instructions.

We once had a client that showed up in our studio, handed his landscape photos and asked us to make it look good. Make miracles as they say. It’s just like having a third party software in Photoshop, you launch it and wait to see how it manipulates your photo.

Before taking the photo, I knew I’ll have a problem with the dynamic range. The foreground is going to be underexposed so I took multiple exposures and applied HDR using Photoshop.​
Before taking the photo, I knew I’ll have a problem with the dynamic range. The foreground is going to be underexposed so I took multiple exposures and applied HDR using Photoshop.

A photographer once asked me if the desired result can be captured straight from the camera. I said yes, given the right light and condition, it can be done. However, timing is important. Given the limitations of the scene, enhancement through editing can help you realize the image you have in mind.

The key in achieving engaging photographs is to shoot it right. Both pre and post-visualization are important skills to master. You have to visualize the photo considering the dynamic range of the highlights, shadows, composition, subject and other factors before you actually make the shot.

Although there are times when the elements in the photo are not how it should be, and you have to decide if you can achieve the initial goal by shooting again or through post-processing. I normally decide based on difficulty and which one will give justice to the image.

The idea is to edit the photo while keeping it as natural as possible. The moment your photo spells Photoshop all over it, you have failed both as photographer and as editor. Unless if you’re creating digital art, which is a totally different medium.

Keep on shooting, everyone!

www.grp.ph | photomania.sunstar@gmail.com

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