Charge to experience - Weekend

Charge to experience

Albert PedrosaAlbert Pedrosa
Photo Mania

OFTEN, when a group of photographers is put in one room, it’s inevitable that the topic on gear will almost instantly be a hit. One would share a personal review on a particular brand, while others would update the group in terms of new releases. On rare occasions, one photographer would open up and share one’s techniques.

This is the part that I really look forward to. While I’m quite technical when it comes to gear configuration, I’m also a sucker when it comes to shooting style and techniques. I probably spend 90 percent of my time learning the different photographic challenges and techniques.

As we invest in our gear, learning photography needs commitment. It requires for you to invest in effort and time. Whether you are attending a seminar or flying solo experimenting on a certain technique, it will all add up to your skill set. The only way for you to learn is through your mistake or somebody else’s.

OSLOB. I was testing shooting HDR handheld minus the tripod, and even if the shutter speed was fast enough for all the three frames, I experienced some softness during alignment in Photoshop. Tripod is still the best option when shooting HDR.
OSLOB. I was testing shooting HDR handheld minus the tripod, and even if the shutter speed was fast enough for all the three frames, I experienced some softness during alignment in Photoshop. Tripod is still the best option when shooting HDR.

If you’re just starting up in photography, you need to put in more effort and you have to see yourself emerge among the respected photographers in the industry. The obstacles when starting up are immense. You’ll have to juggle between composition, exposure, depth of field, focal length, focusing and more, all at the same time. And sometimes, you only have a second to decide on it.

It is understandable that those who failed to learn photography is because of the overwhelming factors to deal with when you’re starting up. Crossing that bridge requires dedication and strong determination to master the art of capturing light. It is the stage where you doubt your creativity and the ability to learn.

It becomes more challenging when your objective is to shoot professionally. This involves the client’s perspective. This time, you need to adapt and use your creativity to capture what the client wants. To do this, you have to have great deal of experience under your belt. What you find beautiful may not be the same to your client.

The worth of a photographer is not measured in the equipment he has. It’s not how popular he is (although in marketing, popularity helps you get jobs). What’s important is how much experience he has learned from all the different obstacles he’s faced. Remember that in photography, it’s a game played in a split second. There’s no time to think. That’s why you should practice.

photomania.sunstar@gmail.com / www.grp.ph

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